Effects of Different Rates of Poultry Manure on Early Seedling Development and Productivity of Solanum lycopersicum

Chisom Finian Iroka

Abstract


This study was carried out to ascertain the effects of different rates of poultry manure on early seedling development and productivity of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). The experiment was carried out at Nnamdi Azikwe University Awka. Randomized Complete Block Design was used for the study. 25kg of sandy loam soil was used and different concentrations of organic manure (poultry waste) 5kg, 10kg, 15kg and 20kg was used to treat the soil. Growth parameters such as changes in length, girth, leaf area and number of leaves were measured on weekly bases and recorded accordingly. The physicochemical properties of the soil sample and poultry manure is shown in Table 1. The table revealed that the soil sample contained higher composition of sand than silt and clay.  The poultry manure contained higher pH, organic carbon, available phosphorus, potassium ion and calcium ion than the soil samples. The effect of different rates of poultry manure on percentage germination of Solanum lycopersicum was shown in Table 2. The table revealed that the rate of 20 kgha-1 gave the highest percentage germination of Solanum lycopersicum (85.44±4.915 %) while the control (0 kgha-1) gave the lowest percentage germination of Solanum lycopersicum. The table 3 revealed that the rate of 20 kgha-1gave the highest height increase from 7.23±0.252 cm in week 2 to 40.27±1.736 cm in week 6, while the control (0 kgha-1) gave the lowest height increase from 3.60±0.458 cm in week 2 to 11.48±1.283 cm in week 6. The effect of different rates of poultry manure on the weekly leaf area of Solanum lycopersicum revealed that the rate of 20 kgha-1 gave highest leaf area increase from 8.62±0.352 cm2 in week 2 to 34.95±2.242 cm2 in week 6, while the control (0 kgha-1) gave lowest leaf area from 4.27±0.202 cm2 in week 2 to 12.67±1.190 cm2 in week 6. Table 5 revealed that the rate of 20 kgha-1 gave the highest girth increase from 0.83±0.029 cm in week 2 to 2.26±0.185 cm in week 6, while the control (0 kgha-1) gave the lowest girth increase from 0.65±0.050 cm in week 2 to 1.31±0.056 cm in week 6. The rate of 20 kgha-1 manure gave the highest number of branches from 1.33±0.577 in week 2 to 4.67±0.577 in week 6, while the control (0 kgha-1) gave the lowest number of branches from 1.00±0.000 in week 2 to 2.00±1.000 in week 6. The rate of 20 kgha-1 also gave highest number of trusses (27.37±0.058), flowers (109.12±0.069), fruits (21.28±0.023), fruit weight (8634.43±0.075 g ha-1) and seed weight (20.65±0.033 g ha-1), while the rate of 0 kgha-1 gave lowest number of trusses (14.08±0.002), flowers (65.58±0.040), fruits (12.58±0.063), fruit weight (3813.33±0.044 g ha-1) and seed weight (14.66±0.029 g ha-1). This study has demonstrated that poultry manure can be used to enhance the growth and yield of tomato in low nutrient soil. The study showed that the rate of 20 kgha-1showed a significant improvement on the growth and yield of S. lycopersicum over 0, 5, 10 and 15 kgha-1.


Keywords


Tomato, Manure, Poultry, Organic, Seedling, Development, Productivity, Solanum lycopersicum

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